Pro Patria and Other Impor­tant Publications

The Royal Cana­dian Reg­i­ment — 20 Ques­tions Operations



Light Armored Vehi­cles (LAVs) pro­vide a safe mode of trans­porta­tion in addi­tion to con­tin­u­ous perime­ter secu­rity for Cana­dian sol­diers patrolling in and around in the Pan­jwaii Dis­trict approx­i­mately 30 kilo­me­tres west of Kan­da­har City as part of Oper­a­tion MEDUSA.

Photo by: Sgt Lou Pen­ney, TFA OP ATHENA, Imagery Tech­ni­cian, Sept 2006

The Reg­i­men­tal Adju­tant is look­ing for Royal Cana­di­ans who can pro­vide answers to these “20 Ques­tions — Oper­a­tions”. If you would like to par­tic­i­pate in the “20 Ques­tions” pro­gram, please sub­mit your responses to the ques­tions below to the This email address is being pro­tected from spam­bots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

20 Ques­tions — Operations

Please pro­vide: Name, rank achieved, years of ser­vice with The RCR (from — to), and:

  1. What Oper­a­tion did you serve on?
  2. Where did the oper­a­tion take place?
  3. What unit (Bn/​Coy/​Pl) of the Reg­i­ment were you with?
  4. What rank and posi­tion did you hold?
  5. What were the dates of your deployment?
  6. How long did the unit spend con­duct­ing pre-​deployment train­ing? How much of this time was spent on exer­cises at your local base, or away from home?
  7. In gen­eral, what sub­jects were cov­ered dur­ing pre-​deployment train­ing? Did you receive brief­ings or train­ing on the cul­ture of the coun­try you would be visiting?
  8. How did you deploy to the the­atre of oper­a­tions and how long were you in tran­sit from Canada to the oper­a­tional area?
  9. What was your weekly work sched­ule like dur­ing the operation?
  10. What were the usual types of tasks you per­formed on a daily or weekly basis on the operation?
  11. What was the weather like dur­ing your tour?
  12. What were your liv­ing con­di­tions in the­atre (type of quar­ters, per­sonal space allo­ca­tion, num­bers of per­son­nel liv­ing together)?
  13. What were the rations like dur­ing the oper­a­tions (type, vari­ety, per­sonal opin­ion on gen­eral quality)?
  14. Did the Bat­tal­ion cel­e­brate hol­i­days and Reg­i­men­tal Days as spe­cial occa­sions? Do you remem­ber any par­tic­u­lar events that stand out in your mind?
  15. What weapons and equip­ment did your section/​platoon employ dur­ing this oper­a­tion? Was any new equip­ment issued dur­ing the operation?
  16. In a few words, can you describe your gen­eral impres­sion of the phys­i­cal ter­rain of the coun­try you were in?
  17. What enter­tain­ments or diver­sions were avail­able dur­ing your off hours?
  18. How much leave could you expect dur­ing the tour, what were your options (loca­tions, travel of spouse) for this leave?
  19. Were there any small locally avail­able sou­venirs that sol­diers pur­chased that still remind you of the tour when you see them?
  20. How did you tran­si­tion out of coun­try back to Canada? How long was it between your last ‘duty’ and your return to family?
  21. And, for extra credit: What medal did you receive for this operation?

Also please pro­vide a pho­to­graph of your­self from the operation!

18831894: The Infantry School Corps & The Royal Cana­dian Reg­i­ment and The North-​West Canada Campaign

19841900: The Royal Cana­dian Reg­i­ment and End of the Vic­to­rian Era

19001914: The Royal Cana­dian Reg­i­ment and the Edwar­dian Era

19141919: The Royal Cana­dian Reg­i­ment and The First World War

19191939: The Royal Cana­dian Reg­i­ment and Inter-​War Years

19391945: The Royal Cana­dian Reg­i­ment and the The Sec­ond World War

19451953: The Royal Cana­dian Reg­i­ment in The Post War Period and the Korean War

19531992: The Royal Cana­dian Reg­i­ment in The Cold War

1992 — Present: The Royal Cana­dian Reg­i­ment and the Peace­mak­ing Era

20 Ques­tions — The Young Officer

Lieutenant Milton Fowler Gregg, V.C., M.C., The RCR


Lieu­tenant Mil­ton Fowler Gregg, V.C., M.C., The RCR

Cita­tion: Bar to the Mil­i­tary Cross (Lon­don Gazette 1 Feb­ru­ary, 1919)

For con­spic­u­ous gal­lantry and devo­tion to duty. Dur­ing the attack on Bois de Sart on 26th August, 1918, he became detached from his com­pany with his pla­toon, and being sub­jected to with­er­ing machine gun fire, he led a bomb­ing party for­ward and rushed two machine-​gun crews, killing them. Push­ing on with his pla­toon, he found his posi­tion iso­lated, so dug in, and by a per­sonal recon­nais­sance con­nected up with the left flank, and by skill­fully dis­pos­ing his men enabled an enemy counter-​attack to be repulsed. His courage and good lead­er­ship saved a crit­i­cal sit­u­a­tion. (M.C. gazetted 1st Jan­u­ary, 1918.)

The Reg­i­men­tal Adju­tant is look­ing for Royal Cana­di­ans who can pro­vide answers to these “20 Ques­tions — The Young Offi­cer”. If you would like to par­tic­i­pate in the “20 Ques­tions” pro­gram, please sub­mit your responses to the ques­tions below to the This email address is being pro­tected from spam­bots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

20 Ques­tions — The Young Officer

Please pro­vide: Name, rank achieved, years of ser­vice with The RCR (from — to)

1. What year were you recruited?

2. What was your entry plan as an offi­cer? How long was it between enrol­ment and com­mis­sion­ing for you?

3. Where did you take your basic offi­cer train­ing and how many weeks did the course run?

4. Where did you take your infantry offi­cer train­ing and many weeks did the course(s) run?

5. What train­ing events do you best remem­ber from your infantry offi­cer training?

6. When were you posted to the Reg­i­ment, what loca­tion were you posted to, and to what Bat­tal­ion, Com­pany and Platoon?

7. How many men were in your platoon?

8. What vehi­cles and weapons did the pla­toon have? What was your per­sonal weapon?

9. How long, on aver­age, could you expect to be a rifle pla­toon com­man­der when you joined the Battalion?

10. Approx­i­mately how many young offi­cers in the bat­tal­ion lived in the bar­racks, and how long was it before you could request per­mis­sion to move out on the economy?

11. What was the best aspect about being a pla­toon com­man­der? What was your least favourite task as a pla­toon commander?

12. How often were you expected to be at the Offi­cers’ Mess? Daily? Weekly? Monthly?

13. How often did you attend Mess Din­ners? How long were you in the din­ing room dur­ing the longest Mess Din­ner you remem­ber attending?

14. What stan­dard of dress were you expected to main­tain in your off-​duty hours?

15. How much were you paid each month as a new officer?

16. Were junior offi­cers often sent on addi­tional train­ing courses? What courses did you attend out­side the bat­tal­ion as a young officer?

17. What exer­cise or train­ing event did you find that best pro­moted your devel­op­ment as a young officer?

18. What type train­ing would you have liked to do more of if you’d had the opportunity?

19. Were there any par­tic­u­lar bat­tal­ion eccen­tric­i­ties (dress or deport­ment) that all offi­cers’ in your Bat­tal­ion were expected to follow?

20. How often might you nor­mally have been the Duty Offi­cer for the Bat­tal­ion or the Base? What was the odd­est duty you had to per­form as the Duty officer?

And, for extra credit:
21. What was the great­est num­ber of extra duties you remem­ber a peer get­ting, and, if not sworn to secrecy, what were they for?

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20 Ques­tions — The Young Soldier

Pte. Heath Mathews
Pte. Heath Math­ews — Korea 22 June 1952


Pte. Heath Math­ews,
a sig­naller with “C” Coy of the 1st Bn, The Royal Cana­dian Reg­i­ment, after a patrol, 22 June 1952.

(National Archives of Canada Pho­to­graph PA 128850 by Paul J. Tomelin).

The Reg­i­men­tal Adju­tant is look­ing for Royal Cana­di­ans who can pro­vide answers to these “20 Ques­tions — The Young Sol­dier”. If you would like to par­tic­i­pate in the “20 Ques­tions” pro­gram, please sub­mit your responses to the ques­tions below to the This email address is being pro­tected from spam­bots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

20 Ques­tions — The Young Soldier

Please pro­vide: Name, rank achieved, years of ser­vice with The RCR (from — to)

1. What year were you recruited?

2. Where did you take your basic train­ing and how many weeks did the course run?

3. Where did you take your basic infantry train­ing and many weeks did the course run?

4. What weapons were you trained to use on your basic infantry training?

5. What train­ing events do you best remem­ber from your basic infantry train­ing course?

6. When were you posted to the Reg­i­ment, what loca­tion were you posted to, and to what Bat­tal­ion, Com­pany and Platoon?

7. How many men were in your platoon?

8. What vehi­cles and weapons did the pla­toon have?

9. How often did you go to a live fire range in a year and what weapons did you fire each year?

10. How many men lived in the same room in the bar­racks? How much space did you have to yourself?

11. Approx­i­mately how many men in your pla­toon owned a car?

12. In gen­eral, what was your daily sched­ule like in garrison?

13. How often were you inspected; in your room, on the parade square?

14. What was required of you before you could leave the bar­racks and go downtown?

15. How much were you paid each month as a new Private?

16. How many days leave did you get each year?

17. What did you do each year for an annual fit­ness test?

18. What was the most use­ful piece of per­sonal kit you were issued at that time?

19. What was the least use­ful piece of per­sonal kit you were issued at that time?

20. When the Bat­tal­ion did a Change of Com­mand parade, how long did you spend on the parade square prac­tic­ing drill?

And, for extra credit:
21. What was a usual pun­ish­ment one of your room­mates would get for a charge of AWOL?

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